Innovation Magazine July-August 2019

Just the facts about Engineers Canada-sponsored Professional Retiree Health & Dental Insurance

Professional Retiree Health & Dental Insurance can help If you’re retiring, self-employed or starting your own business, Engineers Canada ošers three coverage options. They can help ošset many expected and unexpected out-of-pocket health and dental care costs that may not be covered by your government health insurance plan.

With the base plan , your acceptance is guaranteed. * With the bridge plan , your acceptance is guaranteed if you apply within 60 days of your group plan expiring. * With the comprehensive plan , you get the highest maximum coverage we o€er.

To learn more and apply:

professionalretiree.com/ egbc 1 877 598-2273

* No medical exam or questionnaire required when you apply. Guaranteed acceptance upon meeting the eligibility criteria and receipt of rst premium payment.

Manulife, Manulife & Stylized M Design, and Stylized M Design are trademarks of The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company and are used by it, and by its a€liates under license. All rights reserved. © 2019 The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company. Manulife, P.O. Box 670, Stn Waterloo, ON N2J 4B8. Underwri–en by The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company

INNOVAT ION

July/August 2019 | volume 23 number 4

NEWS / DEPARTMENTS

COVER STORY THE COLD WAR CAPABILITIES OF AN UNDERWATER AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE Autonomous underwater vehicles can do just about anything below the surface of the water: map ocean floors, check the thickness of pipes, and survey glaciers. But one vehicle in particular took on a very unusual and particular job: laying cable to help keep an eye on more than two hundred Soviet submarines roaming Arctic waters.

6

ASSOCIATION

6 CORRECTIONS 16 INSIDE PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 17 COUNCIL REPORT 32 DISCIPLINE AND ENFORCEMENT 38 IN MEMORIAM 39 CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

18

COMMENT

4 VIEWPOINT

OTHER

INTEGRATED TRANSPORTATION’S MISSING LINK

35 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 38 CLASSIFIEDS 38 DISPLAY ADVERTISERS INDEX

Integrated transportation is playing an increasing role in governing how vehicles get from one place to another. But despite its growing presence and effectiveness, integrated transportation is limited by the fact that most vehicles can’t yet send or receive communications or instructions. Its greatest potential lies in connected vehicles—which could be closer to everyday use than we think.

8

ON THE COVER Orrin Malacko, EIT, and Bruce Butler, P.Eng., stand next to Explorer (L) and Theseus (R). Today's autonomous underwater vehicles can tackle a wide range of jobs, but Theseus was specifically designed to install an acoustic system that could monitor enemy submarine activity. P hoto : M ike C rane P hotography

COUNCIL ELECTION AND NOMINATION PROCESS There are 12 candidates for the

2019/2020 Council election. The new Professional Governance Act requires that candidates must be approved by the Nominating Committee using a merit- based process. Here, we provide the list of candidates and important election dates, and outline the nomination process in detail.

26

I N N O V A T I O N J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 3

INNOVAT ION

July/August 2019 | volume

23 number

4

CORPORATE REGULATION MEANS A LEVEL PLAYING FIELD AND A SAFER PUBLIC Most of us know that Engineers and Geoscientists BC is only able to regulate individual members. British Columbia has been out-of-step with the rest of Canada as one of only two jurisdictions in the country that does not regulate engineering and geoscience corporations. Council has discussed the idea of regulating companies many times over the past several years: British Columbians look to Engineers and Geoscientists BC, especially after high-profile

ENGINEERS AND GEOSCIENTISTS BRITISH COLUMBIA Suite 200 - 4010 Regent Street, Burnaby, BC Canada V5C 6N2 Tel: 604.430.8035 Fax: 604.430.8085 Email: info@egbc.ca Web: egbc.ca Toll free: 1.888.430.8035 COUNCIL 2018/2019 President K. Tarnai-Lokhorst, P.Eng., FEC, FGC (Hon.) Vice-President H.G. Kelly, P.Eng. Immediate Past President C.J.A. Andrewes, P.Eng., CPA, CMA

Dr. Katherina Tarnai- Lokhorst, P.Eng., FEC, FGC (Hon.), President president@egbc.ca

COUNCILLORS D.W. Barry, P.Eng.; S. Cheema, CPA, CA; A.B. Dixon-Warren, P.Geo.; C.J. Hickson, P.Geo., FGC; K. Laloge, CPA, CA, TEP; S. MacDougall, P.Eng.; L. Mah, P.Eng., FEC; R.B. Nanson, P.Eng.; R.N. Rajapakse, P.Eng.; L. Spence, P.Eng.; J. Turner, P.Ag. (ret); K.P. Turner, P.Eng., FEC, FGC (Hon.); J.D. Vincent, P.Geo.; T.C. Watson, P.Eng.; D. Wells, JD ASSOCIATION STAFF A.J. English, P.Eng., Chief Executive Officer and Registrar T.M.Y. Chong, P.Eng., Chief Regulatory Officer and Deputy Registrar J. Cho, CPA, CGA Chief Financial and Administration Officer M. Logan, Chief Of Strategic Operations M.L. Archibald, Director, Communications and Stakeholder Engagement D. Gamble, Director, Information Systems P.R. Mitchell, P.Eng., Director, Professional Practice, Standards and Development D. Olychick, Director, Corporate Governance and Strategy G.M. Pichler, P.Eng., Director, Registration E. Swartz, LL.B, Director, Legislation, Ethics and Compliance M.A. Rigolo, P.Eng., Director, Programs and Professional Development L. Steele, P.Geo., Associate Director, Professional Practice A. Tan, CPA, CMA Associate Director, Finance and Administration

incidents, to determine whether more could be done to ensure our standards are being upheld. Well, the passing of the new Professional Governance Act in the fall of 2018 brought an end to the discussion: corporate regulation will soon become a reality for the association, members, and the public. Fortunately, Council has been carefully studying the idea since 2015. And, in June, our Advisory Task Force on Corporate Practice completed the third and final phase of its mandate to recommend how we should implement corporate regulation into our existing regulatory framework. The Task Force reviewed existing models, sought the views of members and stakeholders, and developed a comprehensive series of recommendations as well as a business plan. The Task Force recommended a model with broad coverage, including all entities that provide engineering or geoscience products or services, in the private and public sectors. This broad coverage carries with it many benefits. In essence, the same standards that we expect from our members —regarding ethics, quality, and professional development—would now be expected from the organizations for whom they work. This effectively levels the playing field: all organizations would be required to meet the same high ethical and professional standards regardless of industry or sector, and these same organizations would be required to support individual engineers and geoscientists in their pursuit of continuing professional development. I wish to publicly express my gratitude to the Advisory Task Force on Corporate Practice. Your work, spanning many years, will now guide us through the complexities of corporate practice and help us design an effective system for engineers and geoscientists in British Columbia that will promote a safer environment for the people of BC, ultimately instilling even more confidence in the professions that people trust every day. Thank you.

Chris Hawley, Managing Editor

EDITORIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE M.I.H. Bhuiyan, P.Eng.; E.A. Brown, P.Eng.; K.C. Chan, P.Eng., CPA; T. George, P.Eng.; H. Ghalibafian, P.Eng.; G. Grill, P.Eng.; R. Ord, P.Eng.; M.J. Zieleman, EIT

Advertising material must reach the publication by the first day of the first month (e.g., May 1 for the JULY/AUGUST issue), or by the first business day immediately preceding the first day of the first month. Advertising Contact: Gillian Cobban Tel: 604.929.6733 Email: advertising@egbc.ca

Design/Production: Mary Montica Poole–re:fresh design Printed in Canada by Mitchell Press Ltd on recycled paper

Subscription ratesper issue$4.50;six issuesyearly$25.00. (Ratesdonot include tax.)

Innovation is published six times a year by Engineers and Geoscientists British Columbia. As the official publication of the association, Innovation is circulated to members of the engineering and geoscience professions, architects, contractors and industry executives. The views expressed in any article contained herein do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of the Council or membership of this association. Submission Guidelines: Innovation encourages unsolicited articles and photos. By submitting material to Innovation , you grant Engineers and Geoscientists BC a royalty-free, worldwide licence to publish the material; and you warrant that you have the authority to grant such rights and have obtained waivers of all associated moral rights. Innovation reserves the right to edit material for length, clarity and conformity with our editorial guidelines (egbc.ca/innovation-editorial) and is under no obligation to publish any or all submissions or any portion thereof, including credits. All material is copyright. Please contact the Managing Editor for reprint permission.

ISSN 1206-3622 Publications Mail Agreement No 40065271. Registration No 09799.

Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to Innovation , Suite 200 - 4010 Regent Street, Burnaby, BC V5C 6N2.

US Postmaster: Innovation (ISSN 1206-3622) is published bimonthly for $25.00 per year by Engineers and Geoscientists British Columbia, c/o US Agent-Transborder Mail, 4708 Caldwell Rd E, Edgewood, WA 98372-9221. Periodicals postage paid at Puyallup, WA, and at additional mailing offices, US PO #007-927. POSTMASTER send address changes (covers only) to Innovation , c/o Transborder Mail, PO Box 6016, Federal Way, WA 98063-6016.

4 J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

I N N O V A T I O N

We’ve got

On high-efficiency space and water heating systems, plus custom programs to help you build for better

energy performance.* That’s energy at work. Start saving at fortisbc.com/businessrebates .

*Terms and conditions apply. FortisBC may modify or cancel programs at any time. FortisBC Inc. and FortisBC Energy Inc. use the FortisBC name and logo under license from Fortis Inc. (19-022.13.26 07/2019)

19-022.13.26-InnovationPrintAd-7.125x10-PRESS.indd 1

7/3/2019 3:34:57 PM

A S S O C I A T I O N

NEW SECTIONS OF THE PROFESSIONAL GOVERNANCE ACT COME INTO FORCE The first set of regulations for the Professional Governance Act (the Act ) took effect on June 1, 2019. These regulations establish the new Office of the Superintendent of Professional Governance allowing for the appointment of the Superintendent and staff, and the establishment of the office. The BC Government, on June 18, appointed Paul Craven to lead the new Office of the Superintendent of Professional Governance (see next page). In addition, the new regulations bring into force some of the new requirements pertaining to elections and nominations, specifically a requirement that all candidates standing for election must be approved by the Nominating Committee using a merit-based process. Engineers and Geoscientists BC was well-prepared for this new requirement. Having anticipated the change, the association established a new merit-based selection process, which was developed by an advisory task force, and sought government feedback. Our new nomination process is currently underway and fully compliant with the new requirements (see page 8). It has also been noted by government as a model for the other regulators to follow.

Beginning this year, nominations for election can only be made by the association’s Nominating Committee. Additionally, under the new regulations, nomination by 25 members is no longer permitted. While the new legislation sets out the broad policy framework, the majority of the Act requires the development of supporting, more detailed regulations. These regulations must be approved by Cabinet before the associated provisions of the Act , and the new requirements on the five professional regulators, take effect. In November 2018, the BC Government passed the Professional Governance Act , which will consolidate government oversight of the five professional regulators for engineering and geoscience, forestry, agrology, applied biology, and applied science technology under a new Office of the Superintendent of Professional Governance. The legislation will come into force over the next few years as regulations are developed to support its implementation. As each regulation is developed and details are determined, it is expected to involve its own consultation process, which Engineers and Geoscientists BC will be actively participating in. More information on the Professional Governance Act is available on our website, at egbc.ca/professional-governance . Full details

about the nomination process, current and future changes to Council nominations, and important dates in 2019 for Council election is provided on page 9 and our website, at egbc.ca/council-election .

FREE WEBINAR High Impact

Presentation Skills for Career Advancement —––––—— B —––––—— epictraining.ca/ HICareer

C O R R E C T I O N S

In the May/June 2019 edition of Innovation , on page 37, we misstated the capacity of the Muskwa River Outfall project, designed by Kerr Wood Leidal. The outfall should have been described as being “designed for 25 megalitres per day of disinfected effluent from Fort Nelson’s wastewater treatment plant.” In addition, on page 27, Derek Budde, EIT, was erroneously included as a project participant in the 52-storey Vancouver House tower. Innovation regrets the errors. We have corrected both descriptions in our online edition, found at egbc.ca/innovation .

LEARN. GROW. SUCCEED. EPIC courses cover a wide range of disciplines, provide CEUs/PDHs that will meet your Association’s requirements, and are taught

Here are a few upcoming courses, visit our website

for the full list. Evaluation and Rehabilitation of Pavements Foundations of Construction Law Control Systems for Electrical and Mechanical Engineers Contaminated Soil and Groundwater, Assessment and Remediation

by experienced professionals. REQUIRE TEAM TRAINING?

Consider EPIC’s On-Site Training program.

1.888.217.5910 // epictraining.ca/egbc

6 J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

I N N O V A T I O N

A S S O C I A T I O N

SUPERINTENDENT ANNOUNCED FOR THE OFFICE OF PROFESSIONAL GOVERNANCE

the new Act is in the public interest and that they understand the complexities and risk, and positive alternatives, to any proposed policy change. The first phase of regulations to implement the Professional Governance Act came into force on June 1, 2019, which established the Office of the Superintendent of Professional Governance. More information about the Office of the Superintendent of Professional Governance is provided at professionalgovernancebc.ca .

On June 18, 2019, the BC Government announced that Paul Craven will lead the new Office of the Superintendent of Professional Governance. Mr. Craven brings significant experience to the role of superintendent, having previously served in the B.C. Environmental Assessment Office as executive director of strategic services and compliance. As outlined in the new Professional Governance Act , the office will oversee Engineers and Geoscientists BC, as well

as the four other regulatory bodies included in the legislation to ensure qualified professionals are acting in the public interest. The superintendent’s office will have the power to issue guidelines and directives to regulators to ensure compliance and enforcement of best practices and high professional and ethical standards. Engineers and Geoscientists BC met with the Superintendent in late June and look forward to working with him and his team to ensure the implementation of

WHERE ENGINEERING LEADERS ARE MADE.

Discover the UBC Master of Engineering Leadership.

Get the business management, leadership and specialized engineering technical skills you need to progress in your career. Take the next step and advance your skills with a comprehensive 12-month professional master’s degree at one of the world’s top 40 universities.

mel.ubc.ca/innovation

Specializations available: Advanced Materials Manufacturing | Clean Energy Engineering | Dependable Software Systems | Green Bio-Products | Integrated Water Management | High Performance Buildings | Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering | Urban Systems

I N N O V A T I O N

J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

7

A S S O C I A T I O N

COUNCIL ELECTION AND NOMINATION PROCESS Engineers and Geoscientists BC holds a Council election annually. This September, association members will elect one President, one Vice President, and five Councillors. Below you will find more information on the list of nominees standing for election for the 2019/2020 Council as well as important dates in the election process.

NOMINATION PROCESS The first set of regulations for the new Professional Governance Act , which took effect on June 1, 2019, stipulate that all candidates standing for election must be approved by the Nominating Committee, using a merit-based process. Under these new regulations, nominations by 25 members are no longer permitted. The association anticipated this change and established a new merit-based selection process, which was developed by an advisory group and approved by a council subcommittee. The candidate selection framework includes: a gap analysis (i.e., a review of the skills and experience of remaining Councillors); the prioritization of desired skills for prospective nominees, competencies and experience; diversity considerations; a systematic assessment of candidate skills and competences; and candidate interviews. To support this process, all prospective nominees were asked to provide: a written summary of their interest to serve on Council; a current CV; details of how their experience related to the desired skills and competencies; responses to supplementary conflict of interest and declaration questions; and three references. Following submission of the required information, all candidates also received a first interview. Using all of the above information, the Nominating Committee reviewed and assessed all prospective nominees using a rating matrix based on the desired skills and competencies. The committee then shortlisted candidates to advance to a second interview. The second interview was conducted by an interview panel comprised of three members of the Nominating Committee.

financial literacy, risk management, human resources, strategy, regulatory understanding, governance, and technical proficiency. It is not necessary for each member of Council to have experience in each area; as part of its process, the Nominating Committee conducted a gap analysis to identify the skills and experience of continuing councillors and the complementary skills and experience that would bring value to the next Council. To fulfil its mandate, the committee sought candidates through a series of Call for Nominations notices sent to the membership, and committee members reached out to potential candidates in regions throughout the province of BC.

More information on the candidate selection framework followed by the Nominating Committee is provided on our website, at egbc.ca/council-election .

ROLE OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE

The Nominating Committee is made up of 14 members: the immediate Past-President (Chair), 5 members appointed by Council, and 8 members appointed by the Branches. This committee is charged with selecting a list of candidates that they believe best demonstrate the qualities needed for strong leadership in the association. This committee sought candidates that have demonstrated skills in leadership,

Following this comprehensive and rigorous process, the following candidates were approved by the Nominating Committee to stand for the 2019 election:

CANDIDATE Presidential (one to be elected)

DISCIPLINE CITY

L. (Lianna) Mah, P.Eng., FEC

Civil

Burnaby

T.C. (Tim) Watson, P.Eng.

Chemical

Vancouver

Vice Presidential (one to be elected) D.I. (David) Harvey, P.Eng., Struct.Eng., FEC Structural

Richmond

L.B. (Larry) Spence, P.Eng.

Mechanical

Trail

Councillor (five to be elected) M.A. (Mark) Adams, P.Eng.

Mining

North Vancouver

B. (Brian) Dick, Eng. L.

Electrical

Nanaimo

N.F. (Nathan) Ozog, P.Eng., FEC

Electrical

Vancouver

C.E. (Christine) Plante, P.Geo.

Geology

Whitehorse

J.T. (Tom) Tiedje, P.Eng.

Electrical

Victoria

J.D. (Jeremy) Vincent, P.Geo.

Geology

Victoria

B.C. (Brent) Ward, P.Geo., FGC, FEC (Hon)

Geology

Coquitlam

E.J. (Edwin) Zander, Eng. L.

Mechanical

Abbotsford

8 J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

I N N O V A T I O N

IMPORTANT DATES

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2019 To ensure you receive information and instructions about Council voting, please update your contact information at egbc.ca/ update-info by August 30, 2019. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2019 Election package and ballots will be available online to all members by this date. Paper ballots available by request. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2019 All ballots must be submitted and received by 12:00 PM.

Smart. Choice.

Subgrade Stabilization

Stormwater Management

ABOUT PAPER BALLOTS

Pavement Preservation

Containment/Waterproofing

The overwhelming majority of Engineers and Geoscientists BC members vote electronically. Paper ballots will be available for the 2019 and 2020 election. Beginning 2021, only electronic voting will be available.

Geogrids Geotextiles Geomembranes Stormwater Solutions Fiber Reinforced Asphalt

800.663.0478 nilex.com

I N N O V A T I O N

J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

9

A S S O C I A T I O N

MEMBERS PROVIDE FEEDBACK ON PROPOSED CHANGES TO CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

and in all locations, including those offered at no- or low-cost. · Flexibility in Application : There needs to be flexibility in the application of a mandatory program and certain members should be exempt from meeting requirements. · Members’ Responsibility: Each member should take responsibility for maintaining records of participation in CPD activities and only be required to provide a high- level report to the association. Engineers and Geoscientists BC’s CPD Committee is now reviewing the feedback collected from this consultation process, and will be considering this input as they finalize their proposed revision to the CPD model. The model will be presented to Engineers and Geoscientists BC Council for approval in September. Subject to the model being approved, it is expected changes will come into affect within 1-2 years. To learn more about about the association’s work on the CPD program, visit egbc.ca/cpd-consultation .

supports our members in meeting their current obligations, as well as to assist with the transition to the anticipated mandatory requirements.” Members provided their input on a number of potential changes to the way professional development requirements are set out, including how to determine the number of hours required, the number and type of activity categories, acceptable CPD activities, and reporting requirements. From the survey, our members communicated the following common themes. · Managing hours : Most members are constantly maintaining and improving their professional competency through on the job experience. As such, professional practice hours should continue to count towards CPD requirements. · Activity Type: A wide variety of activities (i.e., seminar presentations, webinar, mentoring) should be considered as CPD. It is important to ensure there are enough professional development opportunities for professionals of all discipline types

Throughout April and May, over 2,800 members across the province provided feedback on high-level principles and potential revisions to Engineers and Geoscientists BC’s Continuing Professional Development (CPD) program. While members previously provided feedback on the introduction of a proposed mandatory CPD program in 2010 and 2015, the latest survey was driven by a Council directive to explore modifications and improvements to the current model, as well as requirements under the new Professional Governance Act . “Over the past two years, the CPD Committee has examined issues that affect and relate to CPD—including legislative challenges, government expectations, self-assessment research, findings from practice reviews and discipline cases, as well as jurisdictional research,” said Mark Adams, P.Eng., Chair of the CPD Committee. “While we anticipate the Professional Governance Act will introduce new regulations for mandatory continuing education over the next several years, the CPD Committee wanted to take steps now to ensure our model better

— BECOME AN EXPERT IN ENERGY MANAGEMENT. SUSTAINABILITY EDUCATION FOR A COMPLEX WORLD. Built on partnerships with industry, the BCIT Sustainable Energy Management Advanced Certificate program prepares you for an in-demand career in energy management and climate change. The flexible online format allows you to continue working while you study. Learn more at bcit.ca/semac

I N N O V A T I O N Ad Name: 2019 SEMAC Innovation ad Media: EGBC Innovation Magazine PO#: A20-0035

1 0 J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

SUBMITTING MOTIONS AT THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Engineers and Geoscientists BC’s Annual General Meeting (AGM) is an opportunity for members to hear from Council and senior staff on the association’s strategic progress, key initiatives, and financial standing. It’s also an opportunity for members to participate in self-regulation by bringing forward motions for the consideration of Council. Motions may be proposed by professional members (P.Eng. or P.Geo.) or licensees (Eng.L. or Geo.L.). To submit a motion for consideration at the AGM, members or licensees must complete the Proposed AGM Motion Form, found at egbc.ca/agm, by 5:00 PM, September 19, 2019. The form should include the full text of the motion, an explanation of its importance, and how it aligns with the association’s Strategic Plan. The mover and seconder must both be present at the AGM to introduce the motion. Motions submitted in advance of the AGM are published ahead of the meeting, to support informed discussion about the issue raised. Advance submission also allows the association to address procedural issues with the proposed motions’ movers before the motions are presented at the AGM. Members and licensees may also submit motions from the floor at the AGM. All motions must be received prior to the deadline approved by the assembly—usually 10:00 AM on the day of the AGM.

The AGM will be held Saturday October 19, 2019, at 8:30 AM, at the Delta Grand Okanagan Resort, in Kelowna, BC. For more information, visit egbc.ca/agm .

P hoto : D elta H otels G rand O kanagan R esort

NOTICE OF MEETING Engineers and Geoscientists BC 100 th Annual General Meeting Saturday, October 19, 2019 Delta Grand Okanagan Resort, Kelowna, BC 8:30 AM

WEBINARS, NETWORKING EVENTS, AND AN EDIT-A-THON MARK INTERNATIONAL WOMEN IN ENGINEERING DAY Engineers and Geoscientists BC marked International Women in Engineering Day (INWED) with webinars, professional development opportunities, and

the percentage of newly licensed female engineers to 30 percent by the year 2030. To help mark the occasion, Engineers and Geoscientists BC held “The Path To Professional Licensure” webinar on June 17, at which 150 were in attendance. And on June 23 in Ottawa, more than a dozen participants met at Canada Aviation and Space Museum for an Engineers Canada- sponsored course in Wikipedia editing, in the hopes of addressing the fact that only 22 percent of Wikipedia entries on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are about women. For more information about Engineers and Geoscientists BC commitment to inclusion and diversity, including 30 by 30, visit the association’s newly designed web page, at egbc.ca/Diversity-and-Inclusion .

INWED, held annually on June 23, is an annual international awareness campaign to raise the profile of women in engineering and focus attention on career opportunities available to girls in this industry. The theme for INWED 2019 was #TransformTheFuture. Engineers and Geoscientists BC and Engineers Canada are partners in 30 by 30, a goal to raise

networking; Engineers Canada celebrated the day with a novel Wikipedia Edit-a-thon designed to create and edit new and existing Wikipedia articles about women in engineering.

P hoto : E ngineers C anada

I N N O V A T I O N J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 1 1

A S S O C I A T I O N

P hoto : ©J oanne V inCent / F otolia

2020 CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL COURSE NOW OPEN FOR REGISTRATION Engineers and Geoscientists BC and the Architectural Institute of British Columbia (AIBC) are once again offering the popular Certified Professional (CP) Course in early 2020—the only course in the province where professional engineers and architects can become Certified Professionals.

The CP Program, which is used in Vancouver, Surrey, and other municipalities, is an optional alternative to the conventional building permit and inspection process. Through the CP Program, participating municipalities can issue a building permit on the assurances of a CP, who also must be a registered professional engineer or architect. The CP Course focuses on Part 3 and the relevant associated provisions of the BC

Building Code and the Vancouver Building Bylaw (VBBL), and on CP practice. The 2020 CP Course schedule consists of 12 full-day sessions on Wednesdays, from January 8 to April 8, 2020. It concludes with two full-day exams on April 22 and April 29, 2020. There are 45 spots available—35 will be held at AIBC’s office in Vancouver, and 10 will be available Potential participants are encouraged to explore the possibility of partial grant funding for the course, through the BC Employer Training Grant. To learn more, visit workbc.ca and search for Workforce Training Stream . Although anyone may take the course, only architects and engineers may practice as CPs. Intern Architects AIBC and engineers-in-training who meet all course requirements and pass the exams will be able to practice as CPs when they become BC-registered architects or professional engineers. To learn more about the CP program, or to register for the 2020 CP Course, visit egbc.ca/Certified-Professional . Registration closes on December 3, 2019. for attendance via webcast. The CP Course cost is $4,900 until October 15, 2019, and $5,300 thererafter.

When you need a teamwith deep industry understanding, we’re there.

At Norton Rose Fulbright, we combine extensive local experience with global perspective. Our dedicated team provides highly pragmatic legal advice in construction, engineering and infrastructure. Wherever you are looking next, we have the in-depth knowledge to meet your needs. Law around the world nortonrosefulbright.com

1 2 J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

I N N O V A T I O N

PROFESSIONAL GOVERNANCE ACT WEBINAR: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW A recording of the Professional Governance Act Webinar: What You Need to Know is now available through the Online Store. Professional Governance Act . The presentation reviews the association’s response to the BC Government’s intentions paper, which includes positions on the following regulation

for input to ensure the future Corporate Practice Program was also responsive to the unique concerns and needs of the professions. Having reviewed the Task Force’s recommendations of the association’s approach and delivery for the regulation of entities in BC, the Engineers and Geoscientists BC Council approved the implementation of the Corporate Practice Business Plan at their meeting on June 21, 2019. While subject to the association receiving the required legislative authority to regulate as per the new Professional Governance Act , this plan will provide sufficient resources to implement a new regulatory program. For more information about corporate practice, visit egbc.ca/corporate-practice . technologists. The recording also includes the Q&A session with participants that followed the presentation. The one-hour webinar is provide at egbc.ca/Resources/Online-Store/Products, under the “Technical/Professional Practice” subcategory.

On June 26, Engineers and Geoscientists BC hosted a webinar with President, Dr. Katherina Tarnai-Lokhorst, P.Eng., FEC, FGC (Hon.) to provide an update on the status of the

topics: corporate regulation; declarations of competency and conflict of interest; and independent practice rights for engineering

CORPORATE PRACTICE TASK FORCE COMPLETES FINAL PHASE With the final phase of Engineers and Geoscientists BC’s review of corporate practice and regulation now complete, the association has commenced the development of a Corporate Practice Program that will establish a new regulatory framework for engineering and geoscience organizations in BC. The three-phase approach included: · Phase 1: A strategic review and consultation as to whether the industry to government, manufacturing to construction, Task Force members represented a diverse cross-section of association members from the engineering and geoscience sectors.

As a regulator, Engineers and Geoscientists BC is responsible for ensuring engineering and geoscience professionals across various sectors meet the same quality assurance standards. As such, the association has been examining how the regulation of corporate entities in BC will enhance public protection. Appointed by Council in 2015, the Advisory Task Force on Corporate Practice led a three-phase examination of corporate practice and corporate regulation. From

association should pursue regulatory authority over corporate practice; · Phase 2: A recommended a model for corporate practice oversight; and · Phase 3: A business plan for corporate practice. Focused on delivering a program that supported both the public interest and the engineering and geoscience professions, each phase provided members and industry stakeholders several avenues

I N N O V A T I O N

J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

1 3

A S S O C I A T I O N

KEYNOTES ON CONNECTING AND CURIOSITY COMPLEMENT TECHNICAL SESSIONS AT CONFERENCE Engineers and Geoscientists BC’s annual conference and Annual General Meeting, from October 17–19, 2019 in Kelowna, BC, will include a slate of keynotes that is generating plenty of interest. The Thursday, October 17 This year’s annual conference will also feature 10 professional development streams, including Municipal Engineering Structural, Geoscience, and Environmental Engineering and Geoscience.

keynote luncheon will feature Gregor Jeffrey, an expert on the neuroscience of communications. Jeffrey believes that that the key to connecting and influencing

The annual conference will be held at the Delta Grand Okanagan Resort in Kelowna, and will also include networking opportunities, an exhibitor

George Kourounis

and newly minted Explorer-in-Residence with The Royal Canadian Geographical Society. To Kourounis, understanding why we are afraid to do something—and by analyzing the possible outcomes of our decisions and embracing curiosity—is the key to accomplishing anything worthwhile.

others can be found in science, and he will introduce an incredibly simple way to engage our audience every time we speak. The keynote luncheon on Friday will feature George Kourounis, award-winning explorer, storm chaser, television host,

tradeshow, and an awards gala. The conference will be followed by the 100 th Annual General Meeting and Centennial Reception on Saturday, October 19. For more information or to register, visit egbc.ca/conference .

The Masters Certificate in Project Management

Vancouver & Victoria Locations

Knowledge and tools from the very best trainers in Canada to deliver projects on time, on budget and within scope. 18 days over five months = minimal impact on your work schedule. Enrolment Bonus: Receive an iPad “Go Green”and manage your learning materials paperlessly – yours to keep afterwards! To receive a detailed brochure: Call 250-721-6429 | Email: eisted@uvic.ca or Visit: execprograms.uvic.ca/ProjectManagement

604.684.0727

shk.ca

Offered in partnership with:

1 4 J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

I N N O V A T I O N

Celebrating 30 Years!

Our family has been proudly serving Engineers and Geoscientists BC since 1989. Thank You!

Bryan Fitzpatrick

Joe Fitzpatrick

“In 1989, my father Bryan Fitzpatrick, and my grandfather Joe Fitzpatrick, developed an exclusive insurance program for Engineers and Geoscientists BC . Since then we have insured thousands of engineers and geoscientists from around the province. My father and I are very proud to be carrying on my grandfather’s dream. We are proud to be celebrating 30 years

as an Affinity Partner of the Association.” Thank you for your support! Chelsea Fitzpatrick Vice-President of Operations

Chelsea Fitzpatrick

CALL US TODAY 1.800.663.3739 www.park.ca/egbc

I N S I D E P R O F E S S I O N A L P R A C T I C E

USE OF SEAL FOR OUT-OF-PROVINCE ENGINEERED EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT Through the course of their work, professional engineers may need engineered equipment or assemblies that they would prefer to acquire from outside BC. Purchasing equipment in other jurisdictions may help projects meet timeline or cost objectives. Examples may include oil-and- gas assemblies, such as modular engineered assemblies, pump assemblies, or mixing assemblies for wells, or pre- engineered equipment intended for a specific purpose. Engineers and Geoscientists BC often fields questions regarding use of seal and professional ethics regarding procurement of out-of-province engineered equipment and related engineering services. The association’s Quality Management Guidelines - Use of Seal provides guidance to members on this topic in section 3.2.18, “Out-Of-Province Engineered and Supplied Equipment”. When procuring out-of-province engineered equipment and assemblies, an engineer should prepare and seal specification

For more information about use of seal for out-of-province engineered equipment purchased, please see the “Quality Management Guidelines” section of Quality Management Guidelines - Use of Seal, at egbc.ca/professional-practice.

RECENTLY PUBLISHED PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES

Whole Building Energy Modelling Services

Designing Guards for Building Projects – Revision

Structural Engineering Services for Part 3 Building Projects – Revision

Assessment of Groundwater At Risk of Containing Pathogens (GARP)

documents that describe the required performance of the equipment, and that require the manufacturer or fabricator to certify that the equipment performs as specified. A professional engineer should not accept equipment that does not meet the specifications, unless the supplier documents the non-conformances, and the engineer independently verifies that the non-conformances do not materially impact the equipment’s intended application. Engineers are required to certify that certain types of equipment meets relevant codes and legislation, such as occupational health and safety legislation. The engineer should not sign or seal any supplier-produced engineering documentation such as design documents, drawings, calculations or analyses, etc. Section 3.1.3 of the Use of Seal guideline states that an engineering/ geoscience professional should sign and seal only their own work or that of someone working under their direct supervision. When procuring off-the-shelf items, equipment may have significant technical information already available from the supplier. In such cases, procurement specifications would be redundant and thus are not necessary.

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES IN DEVELOPMENT

Electrical Engineering for Building Projects – Revision

Retaining Wall Design

Watershed Assessment and Management of Hydrologic and Geomorphic Risk In the Forest Sector

Geotechnical Engineering Services for Building Projects - Revision

Design and Installation of Elevating Devices in New Buildings - Revision

Building Enclosure Engineering Services – Revision

Certification of Annual Equipment Inspections

Software Engineering of Safety Critical Systems

Mechanical Engineering Guidelines – Revision

ENGINEERS AND GEOSCIENTISTS BC SEEKS SOFTWARE ENGINEERS TO HELP GUIDE POLICYMAKING If you are a software engineer or member with software

and applied definition of software engineering, develop strategic initiatives to inform industry and its professionals of policy changes, and advise on development of the registration process for software engineering professionals. For more information, or to apply, visit egbc.ca/volunteer-opps.

expertise, consider volunteering to be a part of Engineers and Geoscientists BC’s Software Engineering Committee. Among other things, this newly formed committee will help Engineers and Geoscientists BC prepare policies that describe the scope

1 6 J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

I N N O V A T I O N

C O U N C I L R E P O R T

JUNE 21, 2019 Engineers and Geoscientists BC’s Council of elected members and government representatives meets throughout the year to conduct the business of association governance. The following are the highlights of the June 21, 2019 meeting . PROFESSIONAL GOVERNANCE ACT UPDATE Council received an update on ongoing work and new developments related to the Professional Governance Act , including the first set of regulations and the appointment Staff provided an update on progress to evaluate the changes to the regulatory framework, and associated changes to the activities, policies, and procedures for the organization. A formal plan related to the schedule and scope of the anticipated regulatory changes will be implemented once the Superintendent provides further detail. ADVISORY TASK FORCE ON CORPORATE PRACTICE COMPLETES FINAL PHASE OF CONSULTATION; RECOMMENDATIONS APPROVED Engineers and Geoscientists BC’s Advisory Task Force on Corporate Practice brought forward a report on the third phase of its work to review how the association should regulate organizations that offer engineering or geoscience products or services. This phase included consultation with sole practitioners on the appropriate level of oversight for sole practitioners within the association’s framework for corporate regulation, as well as the development of a business plan that will support the association’s delivery of corporate regulation. This marked the final phase of the task force’s work, and the conclusion of a detailed four-year review of how practice by organizations should be regulated in BC as a means of enhancing public protection. More information is provided on page 13. Council approved several motions that will enable the continuation of this work as Engineers and Geoscientists BC works with government to align its corporate regulatory program with the Professional Governance Act . THREE GUIDELINES APPROVED Council approved one new guideline and updates to two current guidelines, to support the proactive regulation of the professions. These guidelines provide of the Superintendent of Professional Governance. More information is provided on pages 8 and 9.

Part 9 buildings not using prescriptive elements of Part 9, and geotechnical engineering services. The guidelines will be published following editorial and legal review. DATES SELECTED FOR UPCOMING ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS Council approved dates for the next three Annual General Meetings of Engineers and Geoscientists BC: · October 19, 2019 at 8:30 AM at the Delta Grand Okanagan Resort in Kelowna. · October 17, 2020 at 8:30 AM at the Victoria Conference Centre in Victoria. · October 30, 2021 at 8:30 AM at the Whistler Conference Centre in Whistler. VOLUNTEER APPOINTMENTS APPROVED Council approved the following appointments to Engineers and Geoscientists BC committee, boards, and task forces. 2019/2020 COUNCIL ELECTION SCRUTINEERS Frank Denton, P.Eng., FEC, FGC (Hon.), Chief Scrutineer Kathleen Kompauer, P.Eng., FEC, FGC (Hon.) Margaret Li, P.Eng., FEC, FGC (Hon.) BOARD OF EXAMINERS Dr. Thomas Gulliver, P.Eng. Dr. Thomas Tannert, P.Eng. Dr. Yang Shi, P.Eng. CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Dr. Steven Kuan, P.Eng. DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE Emily Cheung, P.Eng., FEC EDITORIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE Dr. Iqbal Bhuiyan, P.Eng. Karen Chan, P.Eng. Dr. Thomas George, P.Eng. GEOSCIENCE COMMITTEE Gilles Dessureau, P.Geo. INVESTIGATION COMMITTEE Douglas Nicol, P.Eng. STANDING AWARDS COMMITTEE Sabina Russell, P.Eng. Dr. Kevin Oldknow, P.Eng. Dr. Susan Nesbit, P.Eng. Dr. Steve Helle, P.Eng. Dr. Jianbing Li, P.Eng. Dr. Jie Liang, P.Eng.

clarification to professionals working on building enclosures, Letters of Assurance requirements for

I N N O V A T I O N

J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

1 7

F E A T U R E

BC ENGINEERS AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES

A LONG, DRAMATIC HISTORY, AND A BRIGHT FUTURE

Robin J. Miller

From Theseus, built for a Cold War mission under the Canadian Arctic ice pack, to Explorer, just returned from deep diving below an Antarctic glacier, to Imotus-1, which hovers to inspect offshore oil and gas platforms in the North Sea—made-in-BC self-driving submersibles have made underwater exploration a growing industry.

Orrin Malacko, EIT, works on ISE’s Explorer AUV, next to the now-dormant Theseus. P hoto : M ike C rane P hotograPhy .

I N N O V A T I O N

J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

1 9

F E A T U R E

This scanned page from a 1987 Department of

National Defense report indicates how the Canadian Government was worried about the number (264, by their count) and location of Soviet submarines in the Arctic.

I t’s April 16, 1992, approximately 360 nautical miles from the North Pole. The temperature is –30 o C. A helicopter drops two men and a pile of equipment onto the wind- swept, utterly deserted ice pack. Their mission: to drill a small hole through the six-metre-thick ice, lower an acoustic transponder deep into the icy water, and begin testing a system that would allow Canadian and US forces to monitor unfriendly submarine traffic under the Arctic. It could be a scene from a Tom Cruise movie, or maybe a best-selling spy thriller. Instead, it’s just one slice from a true story of made-in-BC engineering genius.

In 1987, when the Cold War was still in full swing, the Department of National Defence (DND) began looking for a way to monitor possible Soviet submarine activity in Canada’s Arctic waters. Working in partnership with the US military, which also had a vested interest in tracking any Soviet subs potentially making their way to the North Atlantic, DND decided to place a prototype acoustic listening post on the edge of the continental shelf, some 500-metres deep under a permanent, thick, ever-moving ice pack north of Ellesmere Island, Canada’s northernmost point of land. Then they had to figure out how to communicate with it: it would take

nearly 200 kilometres of fibre-optic communications cable to connect listeners at Canadian Forces Station Alert, on the very tip of Ellesmere Island, to the acoustic array. “No one had ever done it before,” says Bruce Butler, P.Eng. “You couldn’t just drill a series of holes in the ice pack and feed the cable from one hole to the next, because of the distance involved and the fact that the ice shifts all the time, or use an icebreaker—Canada didn’t have one that could get through ice that could be as much as 10 metres thick.” Fortunately, however, DND scientists involved with the mission— code-named Project Spinnaker and ostensibly devoted only to collecting

2 0 J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

I N N O V A T I O N

These aluminum buoyancy compensation tanks each held 20 kilometres of fibre- optic cable packs. The tanks filled with water as the cable was dispensed, to counter the increased buoyancy. Each Project Spinnaker member had the opportunity to sign a tank before its first cable- laying mission. P hoto : M ike C rane P hotography .

acoustic and environmental data—had heard about recent work done by International Submarine Engineering, Ltd. (ISE). Founded in the Lower Mainland in 1974 by former Royal Canadian Navy Lieutenant-Commander James McFarlane, P.Eng., ISE quickly became a world leader in subsea remotely operated vehicles, or ROVs, which are unmanned, highly manoeuvrable robots connected by a communications cable to an above-sea controller. ROVs are ideal for working from a stationary spot to find shipwrecks or explore a specific area of the seafloor but are limited by the length of their cable. In 1983, looking for a way to

work underwater without a tether, the company started building its first autonomous underwater vehicle, or AUV. This torpedo-shaped creation, called ARCS, was intended to help the Canadian Hydrographic Service survey the Arctic seafloor; it successfully completed sea trials in BC’s warmer waters in 1985—becoming the world’s first AUV with proven obstacle- avoidance capabilities in the process— but was shut down for lack of funding in 1986. “Project Spinnaker allowed us to bring ARCS out of moth balls and use it as a test platform for new AUV technologies,” says Butler, who has written a book about the project,

called Into the Labyrinth: The Making of a Modern-Day Theseus . He joined ISE in 1985, “when the computer revolution was just starting. I had been working in telecommunications software, but I was also a scuba diver and had a great interest in the ocean. I really wanted to work with Jacques Cousteau. ISE was pretty close.” Butler worked on the ARCS AUV as well as ISE’s diesel- powered snorkelling semi-submersible DOLPHIN before being assigned to help develop and deploy the one-off Theseus AUV for Project Spinnaker, which remained active even after the Cold War ended in 1989 to help assert Canada’s Arctic sovereignty.

I N N O V A T I O N

J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

2 1

Made with FlippingBook - professional solution for displaying marketing and sales documents online